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Research Article |

Response of NPS Fertilizer Rate to Improved Field Pea Varieties in the Highlands of Bale, South eastern Ethiopia

In Ethiopia field pea is produced in various regions and is widely grown in north, south, west and central parts of the country including, pocket areas in highland and mid highlands with altitude ranging from 1800-3000 m.a.s.l. Field pea can be grown on a wide range of soil types, from light sandy to heavy clay. Fertilizer responses of crops vary with the crop varieties used and climatic conditions of the production. Matching fertilizer application rates to crop needs is an essential component of optimizing crop production. The experiment was conducted at two locations in Bale, south eastern Ethiopia (Sinana on farm and Agarfa) to study effects of different levels of blended NPS levels on field pea performance for two consecutive years (2021-2022/23). The treatments were six rates of blended NPS fertilizer (0, 25, 50, and 75,100, and 125 NPS kg ha-1) laid out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. Field pea variety Harena and Weyib were used for the experiment. The results of the study revealed that the analysis of variance among fertilizer rates showed no significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) on almost of field pea characters tested. Therefore, developing site specific fertilizer recommendations that consider existing soil nutrient supply and recommended fertilizer based on crop nutrient demand to achieve target yield is required.

Blended Fertilizer, Field Pea, Yield

APA Style

Dargie, R., Meleta, T. (2024). Response of NPS Fertilizer Rate to Improved Field Pea Varieties in the Highlands of Bale, South eastern Ethiopia. American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry, 12(1), 1-4. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajaf.20241201.11

ACS Style

Dargie, R.; Meleta, T. Response of NPS Fertilizer Rate to Improved Field Pea Varieties in the Highlands of Bale, South eastern Ethiopia. Am. J. Agric. For. 2024, 12(1), 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20241201.11

AMA Style

Dargie R, Meleta T. Response of NPS Fertilizer Rate to Improved Field Pea Varieties in the Highlands of Bale, South eastern Ethiopia. Am J Agric For. 2024;12(1):1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20241201.11

Copyright © 2024 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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