Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2018, Page: 253-262
Influence of Scattered Cordiaafricana and Crotonmacrostachyus Trees on Selected Soil Properties, Microclimate and Maize Yield in Eastern Oromia, Ethiopia
Muktar Mohammed, College of Natural Resource & Environmental Science, Oda Bultum University, Chiro, Ethiopia
Alemayehu Beyene, College of Natural Resource & Environmental Science, Oda Bultum University, Chiro, Ethiopia
Muktar Reshad, College of Natural Resource & Environmental Science, Oda Bultum University, Chiro, Ethiopia
Received: Nov. 2, 2018;       Accepted: Nov. 30, 2018;       Published: Dec. 24, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20180606.23      View  53      Downloads  36
Abstract
The study was conducted to investigate the impact of scattered trees in farmland on selected soil physicochemical properties, microclimates, and maize grain yieldin Oda Bultum district, Eastern Oromia, Ethiopia. For the experiment of soil physicochemical properties, three factors: distance from tree trunk with four levels (at 0.5m of crown, mid of crown, edge of crown radius and open field), soil depth with two levels (0-15cm and 15–30cm depth) and tree species with two levels with factorial arrangement in RCBD replicated four times were employed. For microclimates and maize yield only two factors; distance from tree trunk with two levels(at mid crown & open field) for microclimates and distance with four levels(at 0.5m of crown, mid of crown, edge of crown radius and open field) for maize yield and tree species (Cordiaafricana and Croton macrostachyus) with two levels in RCBD replicated four times were used. The result revealed soil texture was not influenced significantly (P>0.05) by tree species. Soil bulk density was significantly (p<0.05) lower under canopy of trees than open field, and in surface than in subsurface soils. Soil chemical properties (SOC, total N, available P, exchangeable K and CEC) were significantly (p<0.05) higher in canopy than open field and in surface than subsurface. Soil pH and EC were not significantly (p>0.05) influenced by both tree species. Relative illumination, air temperature, soil temperature were significantly (p<0.05) higher at open field than canopy zone while soil moisture was significantly (p<0.05) higher under canopy of trees than open field. Though not significant, maize yield was slightly higher at open field than canopy zone. It can be concluded that these tree species have the potential to improve soil fertility and moisture beneath its canopy. Thus, integration of these trees on farmlands might require proper tree crown management to increase relative illumination under the canopy and increase grain yield of maize.
Keywords
Air Temperature, Trees on Farm, Relative Illumination, Soil Fertility, Soil Moisture, Under Trees Canopy
To cite this article
Muktar Mohammed, Alemayehu Beyene, Muktar Reshad, Influence of Scattered Cordiaafricana and Crotonmacrostachyus Trees on Selected Soil Properties, Microclimate and Maize Yield in Eastern Oromia, Ethiopia, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2018, pp. 253-262. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20180606.23
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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