Volume 7, Issue 5, September 2019, Page: 200-211
Analyses of Chloroplast Genomic and Morphological Evolutionomy of Yulania Subsect. Cylindricae (Magnoliaceae)
Da-Li Fu, Non-timber Forestry Research and Development Center, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Zhengzhou, China; Key Laboratory of Non-timber Forest Germplasm Enhancement & Utilization of National Forestry and Grassland Administration, Zhengzhou, China
Hao Fu, The General Station of Forest and Grassland Pest Control of National Forestry and Grassland Administration, Shenyang, China
Yue Qin, Non-timber Forestry Research and Development Center, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Zhengzhou, China; Key Laboratory of Non-timber Forest Germplasm Enhancement & Utilization of National Forestry and Grassland Administration, Zhengzhou, China
Dao-Shun Zhou, Non-timber Forestry Research and Development Center, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Zhengzhou, China; Key Laboratory of Non-timber Forest Germplasm Enhancement & Utilization of National Forestry and Grassland Administration, Zhengzhou, China
Run-Mei Duan, Experimental Center of Tropical Forestry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Pingxiang, China
Received: Aug. 23, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 28, 2019;       Published: Sep. 20, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20190705.16      View  29      Downloads  8
Abstract
To scientifically settle the puzzle of origin of fruit plants, the chloroplast genomic sequences of three species of Yulania subsect. Cylindricae (Spongb.) D. L. Fu, subsect. comb. nov. (Magnoliaceae) were determined, which were compared with some taxa by means of the typical algorithm, a new method for genomic evolutionomy based on the evolutionary continuity principle. The results indicated that among some representative species of Gymnospermophyda, Yulania puberula D. L. Fu, sp. nov. has the closest relatively evolutionary relationship with Ginkgo biloba, not with the species of Cycas, Welwitschia or Ephedra, which indicated that fruit plants originated from Ginkgoopsida, not from Cycadopsida thought by the euanthium-theory or Chlamydopsermopsida thought by the pseudoanthium-theory. Among some representative species of Fructophyta, Ginkgo biloba has the closest relatively evolutionary relationship with Yulania puberula indicating that the new species is the relatively most primitive species of fruit plants, which is consistent with the results of morphological evolutionomy. The evolutionary system of Magnoliaceae includes 4 natural genera: Yulania Spach, Magnolia L., Michelia L. and Liriodendron L., whose boundaries all are PHS(17bp)=0.93. Furthermore Yulania subsect. Cylindricae and its three species were described or emended. The holotype of new species of Yulania puberula was designated, whose main typici-evolutionary characters, including diagnostic differences and particularities, was given and illustrated. The epitype of Y. shizhenii was designated and four synonyms of Y. cylindrica were listed. Typical algorithm is a scientific method of genomic evolutionomy and a scientifically new tool to solve the puzzle of evolutionomy of fruit plants.
Keywords
Typical Algorithm, Chloroplast Complete Genome, Evolutionomy, Yulania Puberula, Yulania Subsect. Cylindricae, Magnoliaceae, Fructophyta, New Species
To cite this article
Da-Li Fu, Hao Fu, Yue Qin, Dao-Shun Zhou, Run-Mei Duan, Analyses of Chloroplast Genomic and Morphological Evolutionomy of Yulania Subsect. Cylindricae (Magnoliaceae), American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Special Issue: The New Evolutionary Theory & Practice. Vol. 7, No. 5, 2019, pp. 200-211. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20190705.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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