Volume 8, Issue 4, July 2020, Page: 108-111
Evaluation of Different Blended Fertilizers Types and Rates for Better Production of Wheat in Lemu Woreda
Yehuala Alemneh, Southern Agricultural Research Institution, Areka Agricultural Research Center, Wolyita, Ethiopia
Zerihun Achiso, Southern Agricultural Research Institution, Areka Agricultural Research Center, Wolyita, Ethiopia
Tsadiku Bamud, Southern Agricultural Research Institution, Areka Agricultural Research Center, Wolyita, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 29, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 23, 2020;       Published: Jun. 28, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20200804.13      View  34      Downloads  9
Abstract
Ethiopia is likely to rely on the agricultural sector as a source of income and employment for the foreseeable future requiring optimal and up to date fertilizer recommendation packages for all crops given the fact that increasing small holder farmers’ productivity. The field experiment was conducted during 2017/18 cropping season at Hadiya zone lemu woreda testing site of Areka Agricultural Research center, southern Ethiopia to evaluate the effect of blended fertilizer on yield of wheat with the treatments of six replicated three times in RCBD design. The treatments were: control (no fertilizer), NPS (92 N, 54 P2O5, 10 S), and four rates of NPSB (46 N, 54 P2O5, 10 S, 1.07 B; 69 N, 72 P2O5, 13 S, 1.4 B, and 92 N, 90 P2O5, 17 S, 1.7 B). The plot size was 4 m by 4 m (16 m2) andthespacing between plots and blocks was 50 cm and 100 cm, respectively. The result of this experiment has substantiated the importance of application of NPSB (combination of B with macronutrients NPS) fertilizers in improving yield of wheat in the study area. Despite the need of verification in multi-locations and soil types for wider use, application of NPSB can be recommended for wheat production in the study area.
Keywords
Blended, Wheat, Fertilizer, Cereal Productivity
To cite this article
Yehuala Alemneh, Zerihun Achiso, Tsadiku Bamud, Evaluation of Different Blended Fertilizers Types and Rates for Better Production of Wheat in Lemu Woreda, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Special Issue: Agricultural Extension and Agricultural Advice. Vol. 8, No. 4, 2020, pp. 108-111. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20200804.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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